A Handful of Pebbles


Barnes P

Banner of Truth

Doctrine & Theology

4905


This simple, well-written book analyses the terrible departures over the last 200 years from Biblical authority. The sheer wickedness of liberal theology is exposed in its origins and its effects. Its false veneer of respectability, scholarship, zeal, cleverness, publications prodigious in quantity and so-called intellectualism, is shown to be a wolf that robs us of the true saving gospel and leads us into a bleak wilderness of despair.
£ 5.50


Additional Information

ISBN 139780851519777
TypePaperback

Published Review

This is a valuable though frightening book, written by an Australian minister. By "theological liberalism" is meant a denial of the authority of Scripture, miracles, the atonement, the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, etc. The title comes from the remark of the liberal-minded American Bishop Pike just before he died: "When I turned from being agnostic, I went to Union Theological Seminary, eager for and expecting bread; but when I graduated, all that it left me was a handful of pebbles."
The contention of this little book is that modernist, liberal theology gives nothing but a "handful of pebbles." It is completely barren.
This is a frightening book - not because of its revelation of the evils in modernistic theology - we knew all that - but because of the way it crept in. Very, very subtly did these errors creep into the church of God. It was serious men, seemingly sincere men, nice men, men who used godly language who introduced error! It came into the godly Free Church of Scotland through "Rabbi" Duncan's own assistant. Two writers who wrote books which have been highly esteemed by evangelicals, Henry Drummond and James Denney, apparently were men who did not believe in the infallibility of Scripture. Drummond It is quite startling to learn that the famous Scottish minister Alexander Whyte defended those who were introducing error into the Free Church, and said he had "no difficulty  in going out to meet and hail the new theological methods."
These warnings are needed in our own congregations. When error comes in, it usually enters under the guise of truth.

B A Ramsbottom
Gospel Standard
November 2008